Thailand Retirement House Photos Page 3

Just a few more photos of our retirement house at it edges towards completion in Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand

More photos from Pakchong (Pak Chong), in Thailand, where Kanyah is gallantly managing the construction of our retirement house.

In the foreground you can see a huge pile of sand and some stones. What are these for I wonder, they weren’t there on any previous photos…

… all is revealed later…

Photo Of The Retirement House In Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand Showing The Balcony
Photo Of The Retirement House In Pakchong Showing The Balcony

Next a close-up of the front of the house, shown in the photo below.

This is where we will be spending most of our time, on the first floor balcony and suitably protected from tumbling to the ground by strong stainless steel handrails.

When Kanyah first asked me to agree to these I said “no because I think they will be out of place on a rustic style wooden Thai house”. I wanted tradditional wooden balustrades and handrails.

Always the saleswoman, Kanyah trotted out some powerful reasons to support her proposition:-

  • Stainless steel doesn’t need painting. Wood will need annual maintenance. (Good point, Kanyah, when I retire to Thailand I’ll be far to busy in the workshop to be doing house maintenance)
  • Stainless steel handrails won’t rot. If not looked after carefully wood is likely to rot and become unsafe. (Another good point – I like the idea of not falling 3 meters and landing on my head on the floor – an early end to my retiring in Thailand plans)
  • By the way notice Kanyah’s optimism here.  How long would it take good quality Thai hardwood to rot? 10 years?, 20 years? That’s at least how long she expects me to be living in that house when I retire to Thailand!
  • Stainless steel handrails are cheaper than wood. Now she’s really got my interest. Of course I doubt that and there is no way for her to prove it either way.
Image of Front View Of The Retirement House In Pakchong (Pak Chong)
Front View Of The House

Galvanised Steel Rain Water Gutters

Next some shots of the galvanised steel rain water gutters gutters.

Why galvanised steel? At first we looked at plastic which were rerasonable cost if in white colour. The white colour ones are made in Thailand.

Image of White Plastic Rain Gutter
White Plastic Rain Gutter

But I wanted dark brown colour so that they would be camouflaged as you can see in the picture below – and plastic rain gutters  in this colour are made in Japan hence a huge import duty is imposed making them rediculously expensive.

Also if you look at the photo of the plastic rain gutter above you will see that the down-pipe is rather small. that surprised me for a country that has such heavy downpours of rain. I would therefore expect that several down-pipes would be needed and we wanted just one at the end of the house to send the roof run-off water to the water storage tanks. We plan on using this stored water for the garden in the dry season.

Below is a photo of the brown plastic rainwater gutter and in addition to all the other disadvantages I have mentioned above, ot looks too angular and modern for the rustic appearance I want our house to have.

Image of Windsor PVC Rain Gutter Brown Colour
Windsor PVC Rain Gutter Brown Colour From Catalogue

Below is the complete plastic rain water brochure from the company Windsor of Japan:-

Below, this is sort of galvanised steel rainwater gutter that I wanted, but I would have painted it. And I don’t like the idea of sending the water from one gutter to another as shown in the photo – could overload the second gutter. The photo again is from a brochure:-

Image of Galvanised Steel Roof Gutter Unpainted
Galvanised Steel Roof Gutter Unpainted

Anyway, Kanyah found someone who could supply rainwater gutters made from galvanised steel and she bought them. Below is one of the gutters delivered to site before painting:-

Image of Galvanised Steel Gutter Before Painting
Galvanised Steel Gutter Before Painting

When the gutters were painted, according to the photo below, it seems they did not use a primer, but just painted the top coat straight onto the galvanised steel. No that’s OK if they used a special paint designed to pe applied directly yo galvanised steel.

With normal paints it is necessary to apply a special primer to the galvanised steel before painting the finish coat.

If a special paint is not used on the galvanised steel then the paint will not adhere tot he galvanising and will soon flake and drop off.

Image of Galvanised Steel Gutter Painting
Painting The Galvanised Steel Gutters On Site

Below is a picture of the end of the gutter showing the d0wnpipe spigot which again looks too small to me.

Image of Galvanised Steel Gutter Downpipe
Galvanised Steel Gutter Downpipe After Painting

The next photo is in fact the same photo as the first one at the top of this page – and I bet you didn’t notice the gutter on that photo. It’s even difficult to see on this one. That blue plastic is a temporary down-pipe and will be replaced by a permanent brown pipe once the water storage tanks have been delivered. Rainwater storage is something Kanyah is really keen on. She wants to have massive water storage tanks to keep the garden green and watered in the hot season when there is no rain.

Image of House Showing Rain Gutter Downpipe
House Showing Rain Gutter Downpipe

Below is a photo of our new builder – seems like he’s doing a bit of cement rendering himself.

Photo Of Our Second Thai Builder
Photo Of Our Second Thai Builder

Terrazzo Marble Flooring

If you remember on the Cleaning Up That Terrible Thai Builder’s Mess Post the previous builder had made such a mess of the workshop floor by letting cement from the rendering process fall onto it that Kanyah had to do something to hide the cement droppings. Here is a photo from that previous Post:-

Image of Pakchong House Workshop Concrete Floor Spoilt 02

Pakchong House Workshop Concrete Floor Spoilt 02

I thought that the floor could be “simply” ground to a smooth finish and left at that. After all this is a workshop not a living room. I had already paid for a hard finish to be applied to the floor to prevent cement dust  from being created – cement dust is the last thing you want in a machining workshop which this will be.

Here is a photo of the floor when it was originally cast:-

Image of Building Thai House Workshop Floor Slab
Ground Floor Conrete Workshop Floor Slab

That red colour is what’s called “Dry Shake” – it’s a special floor hardener for new concrete floors and it provides a highly abrasion resistant surface to fresh concrete floors and prevents dust from forming.

Back to the story… anyway, when Kanyah sent me these next couple of photos and talked about “Hin On”  Image of "Hin-On" the Thai language word for "marble" - the stone I had a good idea that she was referring to marble. (I knew that “Hin” means “stone”)

And when I saw these photos I thought that they had poured a levelling compound to accept marble tiling – something like this is what I imagined the end result would look like:-

Image of Marble Tiled Floor
A Marble Tiled Floor (Not Our House)

Below, the first photo that Kanyah sent me, it looks like a levelling compound to make the rough concrete surface smooth enough to lay marble tiles on:-

Image of Preparing The Concrete Floor Slab To Take Marble Tiles
Preparing The Concrete Floor Slab To Take Marble Tiles

Below, more of that messy floor levelling compound.

Image of The Marble Terrazzo Floor Finish Applied To The Patio Area
The Marble Terrazzo Floor Finish Applied To The Patio Area

Above, I had to change the story here when a couple of weeks later I received another set of photos of the floor from Kanyah. Then I realised that she did not mean to put marble floor tiles down. What you can see in the photos above is the first stage of laying a marble terrazzo floor. Terrazzo is basically a concrete floor that is ground down after laying to expose the aggregate (stones then). There are many kinds of aggregate to use in terrazzo flooring – Kanyah chose to use marble chips – hence we have marble terrazzo floors.

Remember I mentioned in the beginning of this Post about a huge pile of sand and some stones? They could be the materials used for the terrazzo flooring. Here is the picture again:-

Image of Materials for Marble Terrazzo Flooring?
Materials for Marble Terrazzo Flooring?

You can see the marble terrazzo flooring grinding process and the finished floors in the next Post.

Road Side View Of The House

Image Showing The Rear View Of The Pakchong (Pak Chong) Retirement House
Rear View Of The Pakchong (Pak Chong) Retirement House

Above, this is a view of the house from the road side, or front garden. Our house is ‘back-to-front’ with the rear of the house at the front, facing the road. We built it this way so that we could have the balcony facing the countryside at the rear and to give ourselves some privacy from the road side.

Image of Another Rear View Of The Retirement House in Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand
Another Rear View Of The Retirement House

Above, another view of the house from the roadside.

Image of The Service Shafts To Hide The Water And Drainage Pipes
Service Shafts To Hide The Water And Drainage Pipes

Above, the two columns of wet cement you can see here are the services risers. This is where the water pipes and electrical cables rise into the house. Those two white rectangles that you see are in fact plastic access doors.

The Next Post

The next Post will be called “Mission Creep – Costs Escalate – Time Overruns – Photos Show Why” and is a monster of a web page filled with all the latest photos from Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand, along with my usual running commentary.

Here are some of the topics covered:-

  • Latest Photographs Showing The Progress On Building The Retirement House In Pakchong (Pak Chong)
  • Is Kanyah Building The House Of Babel?
  • Or Eschers Ascending Descending Stairs?
  • How To Waste Money On Building A Retirement House In Thailand
  • Photos Of The Terrazzo Marble Floors
  • Three Reasons Why Marble Terrazzo Flooring Is A Complete Waste Of Money
  • The Largest Utility Building In Pakchong (Pak Chong)!

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6 Responses to “Thailand Retirement House Photos Page 3”

  • Len:

    I feel your pain – I finished my Thai retirement house in May – started in July.
    Went through many of the experiences you ‘enjoyed’. I also have much sympathy
    for Kanyan. I speak a little Thai but my Thai wife had to be deeply involved in the building process
    and it often made her really upset. Married for about 37 years and hardly
    fight but this past year saw a lot of tension being released on each other – I’m sure Kanyan feels that same pressure – so many things to decide on and you
    hope not to make a mistake. In some ways even harder here because we took
    my wife’s father’s house – tore it down and rebuilt new. Had so many family meetings in order to get things moving – not to mention so many required blessing to protect against spirits and house blessings because the house was
    built in 2 sections. I envy your land and views – unfortunately I built right in the
    middle of a rice village – my views are mostly tin roofs but I hope to do much traveling so it doesn’t bather me. Keep up the good work – I’m sure you will enjoy you retirement in Thailand.
     
     

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Len,

    Many thanks for sharing your story with everyone – most interesting – another little story of farangs and Thai wives trying to make a go of building a house and retiring in Thailand.

    I can’t say that the time I have spent with Kanyah has been smooth at all. Raging fights were the norm. She has a very hot and furious temper and even Thai men are scared of her tongue!

    Although she’s tougher than any tough guy and as hard as nails when she needs to be (not to mention stubborn) she can also be a lovely and fun person. We have a very strong bond developed over the years.

    Even as I write this, I have just sent her a very strong email expressing my complete and utter frustration and anger about what she is doing right now on our retirement house build in Thailand…. overspending and not getting the house finished. Once she has got overt eh email I’ll post it on the website. raise a few eyebrows that will…

    Against that background I can well appreciate that tensions between you and your wife would arise since you seem to have had a reasonably calm relationship in the past. But never underestimate the stoicism and toughness of the Thais and if I dare say it don’t feel sorry for your wife if she gets upset. It’s all to be expected when you go out on adventures like ripping a family home down in Thailand and rebuilding it!

    Hope you can come to visit us sometime.

    chock dee

    Alan

    [Reply]

  • RON CASPER:

    GOOD MORNING YOU TWO;

    THANK YOU FOR THE UPDATE AND THE HOUSE LOOKS GREAT.

    YOU CAN SEE THE EFFORT AND LOVE YOUR WIFE HAS PUT INTO THE PLACE WILL SHARE.

    MY HAT IS OFF TO YOU TWO.

    I HAVE LEARNED A LOT FROM YOUR PROJECT. THANK YOU.

    I KNOW THAT A BATHROOM REMODEL ALMOST CAUSED ME A DIVORCE. BUILDING A HOME HAS GOT TO BE THE TEST OF YOUR BOND.

    MY GAL AND I HAVE JUST FINISHED BUYING OUR LAND SUKHOTHAI AND NOW WAIT THE TIME FOR SURVEY FOR BOUNDRIES SO WE CAN DO RETAINING WALLS AND DO THE GROUND UP AND TERRACE WORK. WE WORK WELL TOGETHER. SHE IS A TREASURE BUT CALLS ME HER CRAZY MAN. I TRY NOT TO LET HIM OUT TO OFTEN.

    ANYWAY THE HOUSE LOOKS GREAT AND I AM SURE RETIREMENT WILL BE GREAT THERE.

    LOOK FORWARD TO THE NEXT UP DATE.
    BE SAFE.

    RON CASPER

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Hi Ron, thanks for your comment.

    I had to check quickly where Sukothai was in Thailand – I was worried in case your land was in a flood area. I really do feel for the people in Bangkok and other flooded areas. Luckily our place in Pakchong hasn’t been affected by the recent downpours.

    I’m a bit puzzled why the land boundaries are being surveyed after you have bought the land. Normally they are surveyed and the survey results put on the Land title Deed document, be it Nor Sor Saam Gor, Chanoet or whatever.

    Any chance of some photos of your land and perhaps drawings or a description of the retirement house you are planning to build in Sukothai?

    Chok Dee

    Alan

    [Reply]

  • Robbie:

    Alan I dont want to burst you bubble but you canot just piant galvanised guttering to do this it has to be treated with acid to clear of any oils if you dont do this then the paint wont stay on it will peal off.

    My wife and I have just finnished our new house and I checked this out and it seems its dificault to get this special acid in Thailand so we have fitted windsor pvc gutters.

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Robbie,

    Your’e dead right about needing the etch primer first and I though I said that in the post, although some modern paints are OK to go straight onto galvanised steel – they already contain the etch primer. Hammerite paint is one such paint that you can use.

    But this just highlights the difficulty I have had all along with this retirement house build project in Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand, – how to control (or at least guide) the quality control from halfway round the world. Made all the more difficult because my wife and the Thai builder see it as interfering and resent me making comments or suggestions.

    Anyway, if the paint peels off it will peel off. I’m not going to be painting it later.

    Thanks for the post.

    Alan

    [Reply]

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