How To Tile A House Roof In Thailand

Photos showing step-by-step how the concrete tiles were placed on the big roof of our Thai retirement house in Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand.

These images were taken by Kanyah in Pakchong (Pak Chong) a few weeks ago. I’m sorry put these photos are out of sequence with the other posts like Roof Tiles On – But Problems Are Arising which shows photos taken on 29th March, 2011.

Image of A Pallet Of Roof Tiles

A Pallet Of Roof Tiles

Above, as the Caption says, a photo of a pallet of roof tiles. What more can I say?

Except, perhaps that roof tiles in Thailand are very, very heavy, and need a strong supporting roof structure. Also, as you will note in the photos below, they take a lot of human effort to lift into place.

Weight Of Ceris Terracotta And CPAC Cement Roof  Tiles in Thailand

This is an extract from the structural calculations undertaken by the structural engineer employed by our Thai Architect who designed our house:-

Image of Thai House Concrete / Ceramic Roof Tile Weight - Structural Calculation

Thai House Concrete / Ceramic Roof Tile Weight - Structural Calculation

Above, the structural engineer has taken 60 kg/m2 for the weight of the roof tiles when he performed the structural calculations for our own retirement house in Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand. This was based on CERIS terracotta roof tiles.

Below are details of the weights of CERIS terracotta roof tiles from the Ceris website:-

Image of Weight Of Ceris Terracotta Roof Tile

Weight Of Ceris Terracotta Roof Tile

Also, I changed to CPAC concrete roof tiles to achieve a cost-saving change from the CERIS terracotta roof tiless I initially agreed to. Here are the weights of the CPAC concrete roof tiles:-

Image of CPAC Concrete Roof Tile Weight

CPAC Concrete Roof Tile Weight

Above, the CPAC concrete roof tiles weight 4 kg each and you can have 10 tiles per m2, so the total weight is 40 kg/m2, much lighter than the CERIS terracotta roof tiles but still heavy.

Image of Tiling The Main Roof 01

Tiling The Main Roof 01

Above, the bottom of the human chain used to place the roof tiles on the roof. Two people on the ground and one on a ladder.

Note how rough the concrete beam looks. This will be rendered to a smooth finish as shown in the photos of the wall at the bottom of this page.

Image of Tiling The Main Roof 02

Tiling The Main Roof 02

Above, looks like one person on the second floor and five on the roof, plus the two on the ground and one on the ladder adds up to nine people in the human chain to get the tiles to the roof. On the roof at the left of the picture you can see the tiles neatly stacked on the rafters ready for laying.

Image of Tiling The Main Roof 02

Tiling The Main Roof 03

Above, a good days work. All the tiles on the rafters ready for laying tomorrow. (The truth is I have no idea how long it took to get to this stage. Kanyah doesn’t give me that kind of detail)

There is no sign of the heat reflective foil that is supposed to go on the rafters before the tiles are laid.

Image of Tiling The Main Roof 04

Tiling The Main Roof 04

And look, the next day the tiles are almost all laid!

(Next day, or days later – I shall never know…)

Notice the wood going up at the eves. Hope it’s been varnished.

Image of Tiling The Main Roof 05

Tiling The Main Roof 05

Above, a photo of the gable. It looks very neat, but it’s not the appearance I wanted. From this angle you should not be able to see the gable tiles, just the Thai-style ‘barge boards’.

Tiling The Main Roof 06

Here is a close-up (ish) of the gable and I want to draw your attention to the underside of the roof tiles where you can see the heat reflective foil that is art of the CPAC cool roof system.

Image of More Soil Raising The Height Of The Drive

More Soil Raising The Height Of The Drive

A shot of the finished roof but mainly the built-up access road or drive. At this stage I have lost count of the number of truck of soil we have had delivered.

Image of Front Wall Road Side View

Front Wall Road Side View

The front wall is nearing completion. Notice the steel mesh fencing panels at the right. You can see that one panel is installed at 90 degrees to the wall and I assume this forms the boundary with our neighbor on this side. But there is another panel continuing in line with the wall and I guess this is in front of the neighbour’s house. Could be that Kanyah gave the neighbour a bit of fencing?

Image of Another View Of The Front Wall From The Road Side

Another View Of The Front Wall From The Road Side

In the photo above you can see the smooth finish given to the wall which was built from cast-in-situ concrete posts and concrete block infill. The smooth finish was achieved by ‘plastering’ the rough block wall with a cement mixture. In the U.K. we call this ‘rendering’. Remember in my commentary on the second photo above (Captioned “Tiling The Main Roof 01″) I pointed out how rough the concrete beam looked? Well all the concrete beams and columns will be rendered to produce a smooth finish, just as you can see with the wall. This rendering will then be painted.

Image of the Front Wall Showing The Opening For The Gate

Front Wall Showing The Opening For The Gate

Image of Inside View Of The Wall 'Wing'

Inside View Of The Wall 'Wing'

Image of the Front Wall At The Gate Position

Front Wall At The Gate Position

Above, it’s not clear what they are doing here. My guess is that they are making a flat strip of concrete for the gate to run along on wheels. Better than a large swing gate or gates.

Image of the Front Wall Viewing From The Garden Side

Front Wall Viewing From The Garden Side



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3 Responses to “How To Tile A House Roof In Thailand”

  • Gerry:

    Hi Alan,

    Interesting info on roofing. As Thailand gets heavy rains, I have noticed many new builds develop leaking roofs, which I believe is due to poor workmanship and an inability to keep modern roofs water tight.

    In Europe the roofing system is usually made from timber trusses covered with a membrane usually roofing felt or moderm synthetic material. Horizontal laths are then nailed on and then the tiles are nailed to them, therefore if rain water should make its way through the layer of tiles it will hit the felt underneath and run down to the guttering system on the eaves.

    This prevents any water leaking into the building interior. The Thais on the otherhand use steel trusses and steel laths. The tiles are put directly on them with no felt membrane underneath, thus leaving the roof open to possible leaks.

    I have seen on your post that you have used the CPAC cool roof system. Will this system act as a rain membrane as well as reflecting the heat?

    Cheers,
    Gerry

    [Reply]

    admin Reply:

    Gerry,

    Many thanks for the comment and you raise some very interesting and pertinent points.

    This under-roof membrane (roofing felt in the UK) idea and variations of it have been discussed between myself and the Architect for the smaller of the two roofs on our house and there are a number of issues to consider:-

    1. From discussions with the Architect, I don’t think a material like roofing felt is available in Thailand.

    2. The Architect suggested putting a galvanised sheet steel membrane under the roof lined with a decorative plywood finish.

    3. My issue with any tpe of membrane on the underside of the tile laths is will the tile laths themselves prevent the water from running down the membrane?

    Here is a sketch illustrating what I mean:-

    Waterproof Membrane Under Roof Tiles

    For this small roof I am not going to add any kind of membrane at the moment. I will wait for some heavy rain and see what problems (if any) I have with leaks. I can afford to do this because the roof is just over the patio area which is of course designed to be resistant to rain.

    With regards to the CPAC cool roof membrane on the main roof serving the same purpose as the roofing felt i.e. to guide any leaking waters down to the gutter, I would have the same comment about the purlins stopping the water running down. Also I would question whether the CPAC cool roof membrane would sag under the weight of water if was not fully supported.

    I am assuming that CPAC provide a product that is water-tight and that the builder is installing accoring to the CPAC instructions.

    An interesting subject, “How to make sure your retirment house in thailand has a leak-free roof”.

    Any more thoughts Gerry?

    Best Regards,

    Alan.

    PS Have you considered jining the Announcemnt list do that you are kept up to date with new additions to the website? Just pop you name and email address in the Form at the top of this page or if you need to learn more first go the Announcement List Emails page.

    [Reply]

  • Gerry:

    Alan,
    looking at your photo showing the reflective foil, it appears that the laths on the underside are spaced around 400 mil ?. If say in the future the roof develops a leak water would make it’s way down to the foil, and asuming the rolls of foil over lap as per a felt lined roof in the UK , and with the pitch of the roof the water should run down no problem, gravity will sort this. I don’t know how strong this material is, but if you are concerned about it sagging, them some galvanised wire or netting fixed between the underside laths would prevent this. The only concern I would have is where the foil ends at the eaves. If the foil comes out like a felt roof then it will be on top of the facia and spill out to the guttering. If the foil ends behind the facia board then any potential water run off will hit the back of the facia with  sure rot setting in.

    [Reply]

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