Archive for March, 2011

The Tiles Are On The Main Roof But Problems Are Arisin’…

Progress Photos Taken Tuesday 29 March, 2011

The next set of progress photos may at first site look OK to you but there are some big problems arising (reminds me of that song by Creedence Clearwater Revival I See The Bad Moon Arisin).

It annoys me intesely that what I see as a major (and avoidable) problem the Thais just treat as a normal everyday occurrence. Much of these issues could have been dealt with and a satisfactory outcome except for poor communication, laziness, pride and ignorance.

I Need To Be Out There In Thailand Immediately…

I need to be out there in Thailand on site immediately to sort things out. (If it’s not too late). As it is I’m not due to go out there until 22 April so let’s see if we can hold off the build for a bit. There are other issues arising too that I regard as so serious that I will not mention them here at this time – but let me just say this:- the house build is not going at all very well at the moment. In fact it’s stopped!

And these photos were sent to me by the Architect after he visited the site on Tuesday 29 March, 2011, not by Kanyah. Thereby another problem and story.

More on that later when I have sorted the problems out (if indeed I can).

OK, here are some progress photos taken last week.

Image of Pakchong House Main Roof Front View

Pakchong House Main Roof Front View

Above, the main roof tiles are finished and looks good. Also I can just see a thin strip of wood on the second floor – it looks like the second floor balcony flooring is being installed.

Image of Pakchong House Main Roof Rear View

Pakchong House Main Roof Rear View

I like the natural color of the roof tiles. In the beginning I chose bright red color, but this color is more natural looking and fits in well with the rustic look I want for the house.

Image of Pakchong House Workshop

Pakchong House Workshop

Above, the rafters are in place for the balcony roof. In the foreground you can see a pile of widow frames on the floor.

This Construction Site Is untidy And Needs A Clean-Up

Image of Pakchong House Window Frames

Pakchong House Window Frames

Above, I’m highlighting the fact that the wooden window frames are just sitting unprotected on the ground exposed to the termites, the sun and the rain. A sure-fire recipe for damage. They should be stored in the workshop sitting on the concrete and away from the elements.

Image of Pakchong House Build Termite Food

Pakchong House Build Termite Food

Above, look at all that termite food, just sitting on the ground. Termites love soft wood and left here for a few weeks that pile of wood could soon turn into a pile of termite droppings!

And look at the masses of wooden posts used as scaffolding to access the upper parts of the house. A termite motorway to my brand new wooden floor!

We have a termite protection system installed under the ground floor slab but it’s not activated yet. The builder should clean up the site and get rid of the termite fodder.

I Can’t Believe That Pakchong Is Not In This Century

Announcing A Low-Cost House Build project In Pak Chong

Here is a new page all about a Small House Build Pakchong.

Micke M is building a 3 room house at low cost in Pakchong. On this page you can see a movie showing his land, photos of the rapid house build progress and some architect’s house plans.

I Was Shocked to Realise How Backward Pakchong Really Is

After seeing in the 2011 New Year at the Pakchong Cowboy City Countdown festival in December I thought that Pakchong was really rooted in this century. Not so according to this story from Kanyah.

For nearly two weeks now Kanyah has been reporting the progress on the house build project and telling me about the tiling on the roof. “Send me the photographs” I repeatedly ask her and she replies “I will, tomorrow”.

But it never happens.

She tells me that there are only two shops in Pakchong that offer Internet connection services.

There Are No Internet Cafes In Pak Chong! (Business idea for someone)

I have been into one of the only two shops in Pakchong offering Internet services. By ‘Internet services’ I mean that they have a PC and an internet connection. You can’t sit in front of the PC yourself, but they will access your email account for you. That’s how Kanyah sends me the photos.

The shop I went to by the way is a real weird place. I can’t work out what they sell – if indeed they sell anything. It has a PC, scanner, photocopier and not many customers. it also seems to stock assorted hardware. The stock made such an impression on me that now I’m back in the U.K. i have absolutely no idea what it was.

Anyway, back to the story, Kanyah is reporting a problem with this shop and that’s why she hasn’t sent any photo’s for the last two weeks.

The guy in the shop she usually uses to send me the photos told her a couple of weeks ago that he “didn’t have the machine to send the photo’s anymore” and Kanyah would have to wait until he went to Bangkok to get another one. Apparently, the ‘machine’ he used to get the photos from Kanyah’s digital camera belonged to a friend who had reclaimed it.

What a bizarre story! And I didn’t believe a word of it.

“You don’t need a ‘machine’ to get the pictures from your camera” I tell Kanyah. Whether the ‘machine’ she is referring to is a cable or software I don’t know. And Kanyah is so computer illiterate she doesn’t know either.

Look, Kanyah doesn’t know a thing about computers. If she did I would buy her a laptop and she could send me the photos via the wifi broadband at The Mansion, where she is staying.

Also I told her that there is no need for that guy to go to Bangkok because Korat (Nakorn Ratchasima) is only an hour away and that’s a big city where you can surely get whatever you want to download photos from a digital camera. And that’s where we left it. Almost.

The Next Set Of Retirement House Build Progress Photos

I don’t know when these will arrive. I’m insisting that Kanyah sends them to me because I know that the house build is cracking on and that the main roof is almost tiled now.
I have asked Kanyah to take a day’s holiday and go to Korat to send me the photos.
I’m just so appalled that Pakchong, which is only 2 hours drive from Bangkok is so far behind the times.

I Can’t Believe That Pakchong Is Not In This Century

After seeing in the 2011 New Year at the Pakchong Cowboy City Countdown festival in December I though Pakchong was really in this century. Not so according to this story from Kanyah.

For nearly two weeks now Kanyah has been reporting the progress on the house build project and telling me about the tiling on the roof. “Send me the photographs” I repeatedly ask her and she replies “I will, tomorrow”. But it never happens. She tells me that there are only two shops in Pakchong that offer Internet connection services.

There Are No Internet Cafes In Pak Chong! (Business idea for someone)

I have been into one of the only two shops in Pakchong offering Internet services. By ‘Internet services’ I mean that they have a PC and an internet connection. You can’t sit in front of the PC yourself, but they will access your email account for you. That’s how Kanyah sends me the photos.

The shop I went to by the way is a real weird place. I can’t work out what they sell – if indeed they sell anything. It has a PC, scanner, photocopier and not many customers. it also seems to stock assorted hardware. The stock made such an impression on me that now I’m back in the U.K. i have absolutely no idea what it was.

Anyway, back to the story, Kanyah is reporting a problem with this shop and that’s why she hasn’t sent any photo’s for the last two weeks.

The guy in the shop she usually uses to send me the photos told her a couple of weeks ago that he “didn’t have the machine to send the photo’s anymore” and Kanyah would have to wait until he went to Bangkok to get another one. Apparently, the ‘machine’ he used to get the photos from Kanyah’s digital camera belonged to a friend who had reclaimed it.

What a bizarre story! And I didn’t believe a word of it.

“You don’t need a ‘machine’ to get the pictures from your camera” I tell Kanyah. Whether the ‘machine’ she is referring to is a cable or software I don’t know. And Kanyah is so computer illiterate she doesn’t know either.

Look, Kanyah doesn’t know a thing about computers. If she did I would buy her a laptop and she could send me the photos via the wifi broadband at The Mansion, where she is staying.

Also I told her that there is no need for that guy to go to Bangkok because Korat (Nakorn Ratchasima) is only an hour away and that’s a big city where you can surely get whatever you want to download photos from a digital camera. And that’s where we left it. Almost.

The Next Set Of Progress Photos

I don’t know when these will arrive. I’m insisting that Kanyah sends them to me because I know that the house build is cracking on and that the main roof is almost tiled now.
I have asked Kanyah to take a day’s holiday and go to Korat to send me the photos.

As soon as they arrive I’ll let you know.

Join The Announcement List

To ensure that you don’t miss out on the latest stories on our progress towards retiring in Thailand why not join the Announcement List?

Just enter your name and email in the Announcement List Form at the top of this page and you will receive an email whenever I update the website. No Spam, guaranteed,

The Roof Is (Almost) Ready To Receive The Roof Tiles And The Wall Is Nearing Completion

Pictures taken during the construction of our retirment house in Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand week ending Friday 11th March, 2011

Image of Pakchong House Roof Purlins 01

Pakchong House Roof Purlins 01

This picture (above) gives you some idea of the size of the house. As you can see it towers over the blue neighbours house which is big enough itself.

You can see that all the steel rafters are on the roof and most of the purlins have been fitted. I should think that by now (due to the delay in my getting the pictures compared to when they were taken) they have started putting on the roof tiles.

Image of Pakchong House Roof Purlins 02

Pakchong House Roof Purlins 02

In this photo (above) you can clearly see the ‘U’ section of the steel rafters. In this house the concept was originally to have an all wood roof structure. in other words the rafters would be wood.

Inside the house bamboo mats would be laid between the rafters, leaving part of the rafter exposed to view. The concept is shown in the picture below. (That is not our house, but what we want our house to look like)

Image Showing Bamboo Wall Matt

Bamboo Matt on Walls & Underside of Roof

Above, this is the effect we want of exposed rafters underneath the roof and bamboo mat acting as an internal wall and roof liner.

Now that we changed from wooden rafters to steel to save money, I’m not quite sure house we will treat the steel rafters to make them look like wood. Infill the open part of the “U” section of the rafters with wood and paint it all in the same colour?

Perhaps I didn’t mention the change from a wooden roof structure to steel before?

This was one of a few changes I made to the specification of the house in January (2011) when I negotiated the final price with our builder.

The roof we decided to accept is the CEPAC steel roof system with cement tiles and heat Protection system. It is a very sophisticated but cost effective product compared to my original all-wood roof structure and ceramic tiles. I would look into it if I were you (assuming you are going to build a house).

Here are a couple of links to useful websites that clearly illustrate the CEPAC concept:-

CERIS do a similar cool roof roof system but apparently it is more expensive and I wrote about it on the Comments On Thai Architects Preliminary House Design page.
Image of Pakchong House Roof Purlins 03

Pakchong House Roof Purlins 03

Above, Health and safety worries here. That worker is about 8 m above the ground and has not anti-fall gear whatsoever!

Image of Pakchong House Roof Purlins 04

Pakchong House Roof Purlins 04

Above. A clear view of the steel roof structure.

Image of Pakchong House - Our Builder

Pakchong House - Our Builder

It’s about time I introduced our builder and here he is (above). He typically has about four build projects on the go at any one time. He is a great guy, very knowledgeable and accommodating. He is also a qualified Thai Architect.

The Cost For Building A Concrete And Block Wall In Thailand

Next a few pictures of the wall at the front of the land, bordering on to the main access road. This is ‘extra work’ for our builder – not included in the original house-build price.

Kanyah negotiated a price with our builder of 49,000 Baht for this wall.The land width is 20 m and assuming there is a gap left for the gat of 2 m the length of the wall will be 17 m. Therefore the cost per meter for the wall is 2,882 baht/m. (That’s £58/m @ 49 Baht/£)

Compare that with the cost for the metal mesh fence of  1,003 Baht/m (£20/m). The wall is nearly 3 times the cost of the fence.

Image of Pakchong House Front Wall 01

Pakchong House Front Wall 01

Above, the construction method of the wall is clear. Concrete posts at intervals and block infill.

Image of Pakchong House Front Wall 02

Image of Pakchong House Front Wall 02

Above, the wall looks a bit out of vertical but I think that’s a result of the camera lens. I have noticed that the camera Kanyah uses distorts straight lines as most cameras do unless they are expensive professional cameras.

Image of Pakchong House Front Wall 03

Pakchong House Front Wall 03

I assume that this guy is casting a concrete capping along the top of the wall. Notice the water running down the wall. Concrete should not be that wet!

Image of Pakchong House Front Wall 04

Pakchong House Front Wall 04

Above, as I mentioned above, I’m sure ti wall is vertical and that it’s just the camera that makes it look like it’s falling over.

Image of Pakchong House Front Wall 05

Pakchong House Front Wall 05

Here you can get an idea of the height of the wall. About 2 m I’d say. Also you can see the formwork for the concrete capping along the top of the wall. (If in fact that’s what it is!)

Steel Roof Rafters Installed – Massive Progress On Our Retirement House Build

Pictures taken during the construction of our retirment house in Pakchong (Pak Chong), Thailand between the second week of February and the first week of March, 2011

Approximately Two Weeks Ahead of The Planned Construction Schedule

As you will see in the photos at the bottom of this page the roof rafters have already been installed. These were scheduled to start on 22 March 2011 and be finished ready for the roof tiles to be installed commencing 31 March 2011.

So taking today’s date as 7 March, the roof rafters were installed at least two weeks earlier than scheduled. Allowing for the few days it takes Kanyah to send the photos to me and the fact that they would have started putting up the steel roof rafters a few days before that I would say that the progress of the couse construction is at least three weeks ahead of schedule.

Below is an extract from the construction schedule showing the dates for the roof installation.

Image of Construction Schedule 110307

Construction Schedule 110307

Click to see a bigger image (Opens in new window)

House Build Progress Photos – Earliest Ones First

Kanyah sent me the last set of photos which I posted on the website on the 17th of February, 2011, so three weeks have gone by without her sending me any photos until now. Therefore the oldest of the photos i’m posting here could have been taken three weeks ago.

Anyway here are a batch of photos showing the changes since the last set, namely, the ring beam complete at eaves level (to support the roof) and some blockwork walls started for the ground floor workshop.

Image of House Frame Side View 1

House Frame Side View 1

.

Image of House Frame Side View 2

House Frame Side View 2

If you look at the ground floor slab level on both the photo above and the photo below you will see what looks like wooden planks. As you should know, the walls and the floor will be in wood (on the second floor level).

I can’t tell from the photos what those wooden planks on the photos are for. Before the wooden floor planks are laid there must be a supporting structure of wooden joists and the wood I can see on the photos looks too thin for that purpose.

Next time Kanyah calls from Thailand I will ask what this wood is for and where it is to be used.

Image of House Frame Side View 3

House Frame Side View 3

.

Image of House Frame Side View 4

House Frame Side View 4

Above and below I’m baffled how such a flimsy arrangement of wooden sticks nailed together can support all that concrete when it has been poured into the formwork and has no strength of it’s own. but now I think of it, I can’t see any formwork, so what is the wood for?

Image of House Frame Side View 5

House Frame Side View 5

.

Image of House Frame Side View 6

House Frame Side View 6

In the photo above, the two white ‘blocks’ in the foreground ar stacks of wteel mesh fencing panels awaiting erection around the perimeter of the land. Actual photographs of the panels after installation are further down the page.

Image of Posts For Front Wall 1

Posts For Front Wall 1

Above and below the concrete columns for the from wall are in preparation. 20 m of wall (minus the gate), cost to me 49,000 Baht.

Image of Posts For Front Wall 2

Posts For Front Wall 2

Now let’s change the subject and introduce Jalan and a disappointing (and dangerous) practice.

Image of A Happy Worker

A Happy Worker - Is This Jalan?

Above, Kanyah keeps talking about Jalan, her nephew who has come to stay with her in Pakchong to help supervise the house build. His primary function is to act as an inspector and to make sure that the house is constructed in accordance with the construction drawings. I paid for a high quality set (42 sheets!) of drawings produced by a Thai Architect based in Bangkok and I’m very glad that I did.

Jalan also took charge of assembling and erecting the perimeter fence, assisted by one labor, and when you look at the photos you’ll see what a neat job he has made of it (except for the welding!)

I have never met Jalan and am guessing that’s him in the photos. He looks happy enough, but Kanyah told me yesterday that he was not well and couldn’t work. His eyes were hurting and he had to put drops in them. Why?

Don’t Weld Galvanized Steel!

Kanyah tried to explain what had happened to Jalan and after looking at the photos I came to a conclusion what had happened to him. I deduced that he was suffering from the fumes that arise when welding galvanized steel (on the fence). I know from first hand experience how awful they can be because I had done it myself many years ago.

I had to make this educated guess at what had happened since Kanyah doesn’t know the English for ‘galvanized’ steel nor ‘welding’ (and I don’t know the Thai words). I immediately sent this warning message by email to Kanyah:-

“Important Safety Warning

DO NOT WELD GALVANIZED STEEL. Galvanized steel contains a zinc coating that produces carcinogenic and poisonous gas when it is burned. Exposure to the stuff can result in heavy metal poisoning (welding shivers) – flu like symptoms that can persist for a few days, but that can also cause permanent damage.

Before welding, grind off the galvanizing.

After welding must paint with special paint”

I,m very annoyed at this. Not only is welding galvanized steel dangerous (and at best very uncomfortable) it completely destroys the anti-rust benefits of the galvanizing. Why oh why did kanyah not send me the details of the fencing system before she bought it. I asked her to end me the information in the post but she never did.

Strong headed and short tempered she did what she wanted without using my experience and we lose out. Typical. Very difficult trying to control a house build project in this way.

Below are the tell-tale marks from welding.

Image of Fence Panel Welding

Fence Panel Welding

Image of the Wedding Machine Used To Weld The Galvanized Steel Fence Panels

The Wedding Machine Used To Weld The Galvanized Steel Fence Panels

In the next photo, Jalan seems happy mixing concrete – presumably for the fence posts.

Image of Mixing Concrete By Hand

Mixing Concrete By Hand

Image of Fence Panels Neighbor Noi's Side

Fence Panels Neighbor Noi's Side

Image of Fence Panels Blue House Neighbor's Side 1

Fence Panels Blue House Neighbor's Side 1

In the photo above you can see the fence on the blue house  neighbor’s side of the land. I have marked the power poles installed by the electricity company to bring the electrical power into our land.

Image of Fence Panels Blue House Neighbor's Side 2

Fence Panels Blue House Neighbor's Side 2(Alan's comments)

Above, you can see what a neat job Jalan has made of the fence (except for the welding) and how long our plot of land is.

Next, the later photos – the house is really taking shape now that the steel roof rafter are in place.

Image of House Frame Roof Side View 1

House Frame Roof Side View 1

Image of House Frame Roof Gable View 1

House Frame Roof Gable View 1

Image of House Frame Roof Gable View 2

House Frame Roof Gable View 2

Image of House Frame Roof Distant View 1

House Frame Roof Distant View 1

The next few photos show the blockwork wall forming the ground floor workshop.

Image of House Frame Blocks Side View 1

House Frame Blocks Side View 1

Image for House Frame Blocks Side View 2

House Frame Blocks Side View 2

In the picture below you can see the first of the window frames for the ground floor workshop.

Image of the Workshop Walls and Window

The Workshop Walls and Window

And below is a close up of the window frame.

Image of the Workshop Window

The Workshop Window Frame

Above, you can see the angled temporary supports for the workshop window frame. There seems to be a row of ‘bricks’ or half-thickness blocks just under the window frame, I suppose to make the height correct for the window frame.

Recommended
make Money in Thailand Logo
Post Categories
Keep Updated
Join the Announcement List and receive an email when something interesting is added to the blog or website.

 

Ads by Google